Posts Tagged ‘Stewardship’

Save the Date 1.29.15

Posted on: November 25th, 2014 by Katlyn Rumbold No Comments

You’re invited! Mark your calendars for this “can’t miss” seminar presented by AgriEnergy Resources from 8:30 a.m.- 5 p.m. Thursday, January 29, 2015 at the Chateau Hotel & Conference Center in Bloomington, Illinois.

This year’s theme will be “How to Thrive in Today’s Ag Economy – 10 Practical, Profitable Solutions.”

We have an exciting roster of speakers to discuss common sense ideas for making a profit next year. They will offer practical solutions you can sink your teeth into and ideas you can use right away. Ideas you can take to your banker, landlord, spouse. Solutions like cover crops, under-cover crops (biologicals), alternative crops, non-GMO crops, and organic crops.

We look forward to seeing you there! More details to follow.

Understanding soil quality: Part 3

Posted on: October 29th, 2014 by Katlyn Rumbold No Comments

So far we’ve learned that healthy soil leads to healthy animals and healthy people.

But how is that related to various forms of native vegetation?

Well, the former chairman of the soils department at the University of Missouri, Dr. Albrecht, studied just that and correlated that information with the conductivity of the soil for radio reception as mapped by the National Broadcasting Company.

His basic thesis was that higher rainfall patterns in the eastern and southeastern United States have leeched out the native soil fertility elements. Therefore, even though there is ample water in the eastern states, there are not enough of the necessary fertility salts for either good radio reception or for production of protein rich crops. He explained that the low protein crops such as virgin pine trees grow naturally in these areas. In the arid west the fertility salts are ample in the soil, but the moisture is deficient for ideal electrodynamic behavior which gives both good radio reception and higher protein and mineral content for crops.

Understanding Soil Quality

Rainfall and temperature determine the degree of soil development. A moderate rainfall pattern results in development of a soil that is good for production. Higher rainfall area soils are weathered to a greater extent and therefore not as adequate for protein production. The higher rainfall areas are capable of growing more vegetative bulk which also means more decay. With decay, more carbonic acid is formed and the resulting acidity replaces the soil’s natural calcium and magnesium.

Moderate rainfall patterns in the west, and higher rainfall but more moderate temperature in the northwest, form soil clays with a greater capacity to hold or absorb nutrients. Soils formed in the eastern states under higher rainfall patterns and the increasing temperature going from the north to the south means a different clay is formed. These clays have fewer nutrient holding capacity. This explains why coniferous forests grow here, because there is little protein potential in these areas.

It is clear that Dr. Albrecht was correct, and as farmers seek to increase yields it is possible to get a combination of carbohydrates and proteins, or only carbohydrates. Dr. Albrecht tied his explanation to climate, natural soil development, and native habits of buffalo and other animals. Many scientists have now concluded that farmers, through poor soil management, have depleted the nutrients from even the most productive soil areas. In other words, commercial farming as we have known it for the past several decades has greatly accelerated nature’s natural processes.

Next week, we’ll discuss what Andre Voisin, of the Academy of Agriculture of France, noticed when understanding soil quality.

Until next time, happy trails!

Understanding soil quality: Part 2

Posted on: October 22nd, 2014 by Katlyn Rumbold No Comments

Last week we discussed how quality soil effected both the physical and mental health of the Hunzakuts who resided near the Himalayan peaks in Pakistan.

This week we continue discussing quality soil, but this time how it effects sheep. It all began over 300 years ago in a town in Leominster when Izaak Walton observed differences in health, in wool quality, in the sheen of body color, and in the quality of muscle meat.

He noted, “It is certain that fields in Leominster are observed to make sheep that graze upon them more fat than the next, and also bear finer wool; that is to say, in that year in which they feed in a particular pasture, they shall yield finer wool than they did that year before they came to feed upon it, and coarser again if they shall return to their former pasture; and again return to a finer wool being fed on the finer wool ground. Which I tell you, that you may better believe that I am certain, if I catch a trout in one meadow he shall be white and faint, and very likely be lousy; and as certainly as if I catch a trout in the next meadow, he shall be strong, red, lusty, and much better meat. Trust me, I have caught many a trout in a particular meadow, that the very shape and enameled color of him was made such as hath joyed me to look on him; and I have then with much pleasure concluded with Solomon, ‘Everything is beautiful in its season.’”

In short he noticed a difference in the presence or absence of insect infestations of sheep and of fish related to the fertility of soil.

Join us next week as we discuss nutrition as it relates to various forms of native vegetation.

Until next time, happy trails!

Where is the future of agriculture heading?

Posted on: October 13th, 2014 by Katlyn Rumbold 4 Comments

Have you ever taken a moment to contemplate this? With so many other demands making it hard enough just to get through the day, this often times gets overlooked.

But not for Dave Larson. And even though he is no longer with us, his wisdom will remain with us forever in the form of one a many speeches, essays, and research. In fact he gives a very enlightening twist to the future of agriculture that I find quite interesting.

It really makes you stop in your tracks and think.

From the pen of Dave nearly 26 years ago:

“We are losing a plant or animal species to extinction every 60 minutes. We may lose, in the next fourteen years, twenty percent of all remaining species of plants and animals, according to the President’s Council on Environmental Quality. The activities of one species, MAN, are totally responsible for the ecosystem changes causing this devastation.

Further, our water, air and soil are being degraded and depleted. Soil erosion caused by mineral extraction, deforestation, and modern agribusiness practices will, within the next three decades, create the loss of one-third of the planet’s topsoil.

I used to hear statements like these and I totally disbelieved their truth, I visualized a long haired “hippie,” completely out of touch with reality, predicting either doom or gloom several thousand years into the future or the demise of a small snail somewhere in the Chicago River.

My understanding has changed! In fact, my position is now 180 degrees from where it was earlier. Four years of experimenting with my irrigation system, attempting to build a non-limiting environment for growing corn, helped me understand the error of my thinking. The changes in the ecosystems in my own soil astounded me!

During that time, I applied extremely high amounts of anhydrous ammonia (400#N/year), muriate of potash (960#/year), and triazine herbicides (at 1 1/2 times the normal rate) in an attempt to raise 300 bushel-per-acre corn with no cultivation.

I speeded up a process which I believe was taking place on every “conventional operated” farm in the world today. I destroyed virtually all the biological life in the soil. One could not even find an earthworm in my fields. I caused the soil aerobic zone to diminish to 1 1/2 inches. The soil became more difficult to work. Yes, I speeded up a process that normally takes 25-100 years into 3-4 years!

“Man against nature…That’s what life’s all about!” declared General Thomas Sands, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. I must admit that I had developed a militaristic attitude of being at war with nature as well. I realize in retrospect that I was a product of the thinking of Bacon and Newton and others who set forth a view of nature as raw material existing for the sole purpose of being exploited. I was further influenced by political and economical theorists like John Lock and Adam Smith who suggested that nature only had value when it was turned into something useful. It had become easy for me to justify the use of the earth in any way at all, as long as individual freedom, knowledge, and prosperity were the results.

I now agree completely with Rev. Wesley Granberg-Michaelson when he states the Christian faith in the Western World has become captive to the assumptions of modern culture which sever God from the Creation and subject the Creation to humanity’s arrogant and unrestrained power. Rev. Michaelson goes on to state that the materialism which has developed has constricted the arena for truth to be known and for certainty to be established. He says, “Now reality can only be proved rather than accepted by faith.” In other words, the true nature of the world can only be known through scientific method. This severs God’s relationship to the Creation in understanding of the modern mind. In short, nature is commonly understood today as an object unto itself, apart from it’s relationship to God.

In the first chapter of Genesis, verses 26-28, the account is related to God’s creation of man in his own image. God blessed man and gave him dominion over the earth. The biblical term dominion does not mean domination of nature by man. The biblical concept of dominions is connected to two other key ideas: covenant and stewardship.

Future of Agriculture

The concept of covenant deals with God’s covenant with man. This covenant began in the Garden of Eden (Genesis 1:28-29) and was renewed with Noah, Abraham, and Moses. The covenant specifically states that God will remain faithful to us and will provide everything we need to live. For our part of the covenant, we are expected to be faithful to God and to live in a loving relationship with Him and with our fellow creatures. In this, God expects us to take care of the land.

The biblical idea of stewardship has become identified with the concept of wise management. I now understand it to mean much more than just wise management. To me it is the process of learning from nature and learning to work in harmony with all of the natural ecosystems, including the ecosystems found in the soil. I understand my specific responsibility for stewardship in terms of renewable farming.

When I evaluate a specific practice in our farming operation, that practice must be profitable and it must be practical if it is to be implemented. I also know that practice must contribute to the integrity, the beauty, and the harmony of the bionic community. If it does not, it is wrong for me to implement.

Wendell Berry has written, “The family farm is failing because it belongs to an order of values and a kind of life that is failing.” According to Berry, the failure of the rural way of life is at root a failure to grasp the complexity of life on earth and the simple truth that our existence depends on how well we take care of the soil.

Dr. Calvin DeWitt, Professor of Environmental Studies at the University of Wisconsin, says, “Christian stewardship is a care keeping of the earth that works to preserve and restore the integrity of the created order, doing the will of the Creator, and seeking for the Creator’s kingdom of integrity and peace — a kingdom devoid of human arrogance, ignorance, and greed. Christian stewardship is so living on earth that Heaven will not be a shock to us.”

As I consider alternatives for the future of agriculture, it is my prayer that I will be given renewed ears and renewed eyes for the presence of God in all of life, and that my farming practices will all be more and more in harmony with the Creator.”

So, I’m leaving you with this — Dave’s future is here. Where do you see agriculture in the next 26 years?

Until next time, happy trails!