Archive for the ‘Continuing the Legacy’ Category

Save the Date 1.29.15

Posted on: November 25th, 2014 by Katlyn Rumbold No Comments

You’re invited! Mark your calendars for this “can’t miss” seminar presented by AgriEnergy Resources from 8:30 a.m.- 5 p.m. Thursday, January 29, 2015 at the Chateau Hotel & Conference Center in Bloomington, Illinois.

This year’s theme will be “How to Thrive in Today’s Ag Economy – 10 Practical, Profitable Solutions.”

We have an exciting roster of speakers to discuss common sense ideas for making a profit next year. They will offer practical solutions you can sink your teeth into and ideas you can use right away. Ideas you can take to your banker, landlord, spouse. Solutions like cover crops, under-cover crops (biologicals), alternative crops, non-GMO crops, and organic crops.

We look forward to seeing you there! More details to follow.

Where is the future of agriculture heading?

Posted on: October 13th, 2014 by Katlyn Rumbold 4 Comments

Have you ever taken a moment to contemplate this? With so many other demands making it hard enough just to get through the day, this often times gets overlooked.

But not for Dave Larson. And even though he is no longer with us, his wisdom will remain with us forever in the form of one a many speeches, essays, and research. In fact he gives a very enlightening twist to the future of agriculture that I find quite interesting.

It really makes you stop in your tracks and think.

From the pen of Dave nearly 26 years ago:

“We are losing a plant or animal species to extinction every 60 minutes. We may lose, in the next fourteen years, twenty percent of all remaining species of plants and animals, according to the President’s Council on Environmental Quality. The activities of one species, MAN, are totally responsible for the ecosystem changes causing this devastation.

Further, our water, air and soil are being degraded and depleted. Soil erosion caused by mineral extraction, deforestation, and modern agribusiness practices will, within the next three decades, create the loss of one-third of the planet’s topsoil.

I used to hear statements like these and I totally disbelieved their truth, I visualized a long haired “hippie,” completely out of touch with reality, predicting either doom or gloom several thousand years into the future or the demise of a small snail somewhere in the Chicago River.

My understanding has changed! In fact, my position is now 180 degrees from where it was earlier. Four years of experimenting with my irrigation system, attempting to build a non-limiting environment for growing corn, helped me understand the error of my thinking. The changes in the ecosystems in my own soil astounded me!

During that time, I applied extremely high amounts of anhydrous ammonia (400#N/year), muriate of potash (960#/year), and triazine herbicides (at 1 1/2 times the normal rate) in an attempt to raise 300 bushel-per-acre corn with no cultivation.

I speeded up a process which I believe was taking place on every “conventional operated” farm in the world today. I destroyed virtually all the biological life in the soil. One could not even find an earthworm in my fields. I caused the soil aerobic zone to diminish to 1 1/2 inches. The soil became more difficult to work. Yes, I speeded up a process that normally takes 25-100 years into 3-4 years!

“Man against nature…That’s what life’s all about!” declared General Thomas Sands, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. I must admit that I had developed a militaristic attitude of being at war with nature as well. I realize in retrospect that I was a product of the thinking of Bacon and Newton and others who set forth a view of nature as raw material existing for the sole purpose of being exploited. I was further influenced by political and economical theorists like John Lock and Adam Smith who suggested that nature only had value when it was turned into something useful. It had become easy for me to justify the use of the earth in any way at all, as long as individual freedom, knowledge, and prosperity were the results.

I now agree completely with Rev. Wesley Granberg-Michaelson when he states the Christian faith in the Western World has become captive to the assumptions of modern culture which sever God from the Creation and subject the Creation to humanity’s arrogant and unrestrained power. Rev. Michaelson goes on to state that the materialism which has developed has constricted the arena for truth to be known and for certainty to be established. He says, “Now reality can only be proved rather than accepted by faith.” In other words, the true nature of the world can only be known through scientific method. This severs God’s relationship to the Creation in understanding of the modern mind. In short, nature is commonly understood today as an object unto itself, apart from it’s relationship to God.

In the first chapter of Genesis, verses 26-28, the account is related to God’s creation of man in his own image. God blessed man and gave him dominion over the earth. The biblical term dominion does not mean domination of nature by man. The biblical concept of dominions is connected to two other key ideas: covenant and stewardship.

Future of Agriculture

The concept of covenant deals with God’s covenant with man. This covenant began in the Garden of Eden (Genesis 1:28-29) and was renewed with Noah, Abraham, and Moses. The covenant specifically states that God will remain faithful to us and will provide everything we need to live. For our part of the covenant, we are expected to be faithful to God and to live in a loving relationship with Him and with our fellow creatures. In this, God expects us to take care of the land.

The biblical idea of stewardship has become identified with the concept of wise management. I now understand it to mean much more than just wise management. To me it is the process of learning from nature and learning to work in harmony with all of the natural ecosystems, including the ecosystems found in the soil. I understand my specific responsibility for stewardship in terms of renewable farming.

When I evaluate a specific practice in our farming operation, that practice must be profitable and it must be practical if it is to be implemented. I also know that practice must contribute to the integrity, the beauty, and the harmony of the bionic community. If it does not, it is wrong for me to implement.

Wendell Berry has written, “The family farm is failing because it belongs to an order of values and a kind of life that is failing.” According to Berry, the failure of the rural way of life is at root a failure to grasp the complexity of life on earth and the simple truth that our existence depends on how well we take care of the soil.

Dr. Calvin DeWitt, Professor of Environmental Studies at the University of Wisconsin, says, “Christian stewardship is a care keeping of the earth that works to preserve and restore the integrity of the created order, doing the will of the Creator, and seeking for the Creator’s kingdom of integrity and peace — a kingdom devoid of human arrogance, ignorance, and greed. Christian stewardship is so living on earth that Heaven will not be a shock to us.”

As I consider alternatives for the future of agriculture, it is my prayer that I will be given renewed ears and renewed eyes for the presence of God in all of life, and that my farming practices will all be more and more in harmony with the Creator.”

So, I’m leaving you with this — Dave’s future is here. Where do you see agriculture in the next 26 years?

Until next time, happy trails!

 

Who’s bringing the Daily Dirt anyway?

Posted on: October 9th, 2014 by Katlyn Rumbold 1 Comment

If you’re anything like me, you want to know who is on the other side of the screen. Especially, when it comes to social media.

Well today, is your chance! Wonder no more!

Aside from growing up on a diversified livestock farm in small-town Illinois, I have found farming is in my blood. I just can’t get away from it.

Daily Dirt editor, Katlyn Rumbold.

Daily Dirt editor, Katlyn Rumbold.

However growing up, I took it all for granted. I had dreams of becoming a musical therapist, and I just knew I was going to get out of my small town and make something of myself. Because in my mind, one couldn’t make anything of themselves in small-town USA.

Well as I ventured outside of rural USA, I realized just how disconnected the average person is from the agricultural world. The things I took for granted like showing cattle, driving a tractor, trail riding, picking green beans in the summer, and making apple sauce in the fall, were foreign to so many. I was being drawn back into the agricultural world.

Fast forward a few years and here I am back in small-town Illinois, living on the home farm, dating a farmer (which I also said I’d never do — funny how that works), and loving every minute of it.

When not blogging or working on the family farm, I thrive on CrossFit, shopping for new boots (hey a girl can never have too many cowgirl boots), ABC’s The Bachelor (I’m a shameless addict), and of course cattle shows. There’s just something about being surrounded by so many beautiful cattle 😉

And if you’re lucky, you may get to virtually meet some of the other masterminds I get to work with on a daily basis. Because of it wasn’t for them Daily Dirt wouldn’t be near as juicy.

Until next time, happy trails!

You want the dirt? We got it!

Posted on: October 8th, 2014 by Katlyn Rumbold 9 Comments

No, not that dirt. Dirt dirt. Soil dirt. You know the black stuff that makes crops grow.

From this day forward we strive to be your one-stop shop for all things dirt related and beyond. We’re so excited to join the social network to better connect with YOU — our friends, our customers, our family.

So sit back, grab a cup of coffee and enjoy the ride. It may be no surprise to many of you that we strive to lead the transition to biological farming by providing training and products to innovative farmers. We believe biological farming is the future of economical, high-quality food production and the foundation for healthy soil, healthy plants, healthy livestock, healthy food, and healthy people.

Dave and Carolyn Larson had no idea the legacy they were about to start when AgriEnergy Resources was founded.

Dave and Carolyn Larson had no idea the legacy they were about to start when AgriEnergy Resources was founded.

And this is our story.

It all started 27 years ago in 1987 when one innovative, American farmer founded AgriEnergy Resources to provide fellow agricultural producers with the educational opportunities, quality soil fertility products, and support services necessary for implementing renewable farming systems. For it was that year that Dave Larson started a legacy that would continue well beyond his lifetime.

This legacy would soon spread from Princeton, Illinois to several of the continental United States as well as countries outside of the U.S.

Much like all of us that are currently living out his legacy here at AgriEnergy Resources, Dave had a love for the land. Guess you could say farming was in his blood.

In 1977, he embarked on an exhaustive study of alternative philosophies and methods for agricultural production. He researched and applied principles offered by universities, other soil fertility specialists, and proponents of the Biological Theory of Ionization. This research, coupled with his own observations of the laws of nature, led him to an understanding of a group of basic principles. These principles, when applied to production agriculture, became the basis of what is now biological farming and the basis of what Daily Dirt is really about.

So, yes, we will bring you the Daily Dirt of the agricultural world, but Daily Dirt is so much more than that. It’s about a lifestyle. An all consuming faith. A passion.

It’s about the innovative, American farmer.

Until next time, happy trails!

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